Category: Uncategorized

Erudus Extended Allergy Icon Font Release

Updated January 26, 2019

Spiciness Characters

Suitable For

Gluten Free
Antibiotic Free
Non-GMO
Organic
Gluten Free
Antibiotic Free
Non-GMO
Organic

Contains May Contain

Alpha-Gal
Buckwheat
Coconut
Corn
Mold
MSG
Nightshades
Trans Fat
Alpha-Gal
Buckwheat
Coconut
Corn
Mold
MSG
Nightshades
Trans Fat

The characters I’ve added to create this release of the Erudus Extended Allergy Icon Font. The above is not an image, but is the font characters themselves.

Click here to visit the project page for the Erudus Extended Allergy Icon Font, where the full download and links to the documentation are located. (updated January 26, 2019)

For the past few years I’ve been interested in developing a set of icons for the display of allergen information on restaurant menus. The ideal set of icons would work well on both printed and online menus, and be clear enough to allow for resizing when necessary. At first I’d come up with a few versions of my own artwork, most of which were rather cartoonish. There were at least three different versions over more than a year.

At one point I started working on a side project. It had occured to me the icons I was developing might work well inside their own plugin for the WordPress platform. After I got the first prototype to work, I found out that Erudus: The Food Industry’s Collaborative Solution to Sharing Product Data in West Yorkshire, UK, had released their own open-source set, the Erudus Food Allergy Icon Font. As it turned out, the EU had begun requiring the listing of fourteen allergen icons on all restaurant menus, including online and food truck menus. The Erudus Allergy Icon Font provided these icons, along with four icons for specific diet types, to the company’s (at the time of this writing) more than 85,000 caterers. The icons are also in-use within Erudus’ own database for ingredient research and recipe development, which their clients have access to.

Suitable For

Halal
Kosher
Vegan
Vegetarian
Halal
Kosher
Vegan
Vegetarian

Contains May Contain

Celery
Cereal
Crustaceans
Eggs
Fish
Gluten
Lupin
Milk
Molluscs
Mustard
Peanuts
Sesame
Soya
Sulfur Dioxide
Tree Nuts
Celery
Cereal
Crustaceans
Eggs
Fish
Gluten
Lupin
Milk
Molluscs
Mustard
Peanuts
Sesame
Soya
Sulfur Dioxide
Tree Nuts

The original Erudus Allergy Icon Font, illustrating the keyed color scheme. Again, this is not an image, these are the working font characters.

There were a few reasons why I began developing the “fork”. or extended version, of the Erudus Allergy Icon Font:

  1. The display of the key legends and other presentation methods were dependent on an online styling method called Bootstrap. When attempting to use the font and its styling in a WordPress plugin, Bootstrap interferred with WordPress display methods.
  2. As a restaurant manager in the US I was aware of other allergens and diet/cuisine types which might need attention, either by current restaurant managers, or at some point in the future.
  3. Using the font made for an interesting method for creating and implementing characters to illustrate the spiciness of a dish within a menu.

Because of changes and requirements within WordPress the development of the restaurant menu plugin is currently stalled. However, I continued development of the Erudus Extended Allergy Icon Font, making sure from the beginning that it had no outside dependencies. Along the way I discovered a few things, including the fifteenth included icon for Gluten (“Cereals Containing Gluten” is the designation in the EU regulations and was presented in its own icon), Nuts should be “Tree Nuts” to differentiate them from Peanuts on a quick glance from a patron, and “the Big Eight” as designated by the USDA could also be documented within the Usage notes.

I hope people find this work useful. Please use the Contact Page on this site to report any issues or if you have any questions or suggestions.

Deviled Eggs, and Getting Those Eggs Right


A dozen hard-boiled eggs, prepared using the following technique.

It’s the day before Thanksgiving 2016. Personally, I’m looking forward to all the deviled eggs at the various get-togethers over the next month or so. I’m seriously addicted to hard-boiled eggs, and if there are deviled eggs in the vicinity you’d better hide them from me. I’ll eat eight halves before I’ll even consider stopping.

It might take a couple more halves before I finally stop eating the things.

One of the more oft-asked questions is “What’s the best way to cook hard-boiled eggs?” There are a lot of different answers out there, some using vinegar, some barely boiling the eggs once the water starts rolling then letting them rest in the hot water off the stove for an additional time, others suggesting using sous vide (that is, if you can afford the equipment.)

Some folks also say it’s impossible to hard-boil eggs at altitudes greater than 10,000 feet above sea level. I have yet to be able to vouch for this.

I learned quite a bit from a Greek I worked for from 1983 – 84 by the name of Gus Pappas. A Vincent Price doppelganger, Gus used the restaurant kitchen’s commercial steamer to steam a few dozen eggs at a time to hard-boiled in 12 minutes flat at low pressure. He’d then immediately place them in a running-cold water bath to stop the cooking process, and have us peel them five minutes later. They were great for salads and such, and the yolks never turned green. If you have a presure cooker, you can use this same process with a steamer basket with water underneath.

Gus was the one to explain the following process to me, which has worked for me every time since. The claim of “you have to use the freshest eggs” doesn’t seem to apply here. They still come out perfect every time.

Basic Deviled Eggs

Ingredients
1 dozen eggs
Mayonnaise
Yellow mustard
Salt, iodized
Black pepper, ground
Paprika, smoked

  1. Place a dozen chilled eggs in the bottom of a short pot wide enough to allow the eggs to remain in a single layer.
    Add cold water to about a half-inch inch above the tops of the eggs.
  2. Place the pot on a burner on the stove, and set the burner to High.
    When the water begins to actually boil, lower the heat to about 90% and set a timer for 20 minutes.
  3. Walk away.
  4. When the timer goes off, remove the pot from the heat. Gently dump most of the hot water down the drain and set the pot with the eggs into the sink.
  5. Run cold water into the pot and walk away for five minutes while it continues to run. This stops the eggs from cooking themselves all the way to the center.
  6. Stop the running water and walk away for five more minutes.
    Return and shell the eggs, being sure to rinse excess shell and membrane off in the chilled water in the pot before placing them off to the side.
  7. Cut each egg in half, removing the halved yolks and placing them in a small mixing bowl. Place the halves of the whites into a presentation platter.
  8. Add mayonnaise and a small bit of yellow mustard to the yolks and stir until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste, stirring as you go.
    Spoon or pipe the smoothed yolk mixture into the halved whites.
  9. Top with sprinkles of smoked paprika.